What causes high pulse rate

what causes high pulse rate

High Pulse Rate Causes, Reasons at Rest, Symptoms, Treatment

Emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is yet another cause of high pulse rate. In emphysema, the tissues of lungs become non-elastic, which affects the normal pumping capacity of the heart. This eventually results in rapid heart beating. Smoking is a prime cause of emphysema and other respiratory diseases. Jan 22,  · High pulse rate is also known as tachycardia. It refers to the abnormally fast resting heart rate – normally at about beats per given minute. A faster pulse rate can happen when at rest, and it can mean low blood pressure, illnesses or even the effects of running.

When you sit quietly, your heart slips into the slower, steady pace known as your resting heart rate. An increase in your resting heart rate over time may be a signal of heart trouble ahead. Your heart rate changes from minute to minute. It depends on whether you are standing up or lying down, moving around or sitting still, stressed or relaxed. Your resting heart ratethough, tends to be stable from day to day.

The usual range for resting heart rate is anywhere between 60 and 90 beats per minute. Above 90 is considered high. Many factors influence your resting heart what can cause periods to stop. Genes play what causes high pulse rate role.

Aging tends to speed it up. Regular exercise tends to slow your heart rate down. In his prime, champion cyclist Miguel Indurain had a resting heart rate of just 28 beats per minute. Stress, medications, and medical conditions also influence your resting heart rate. Results of observational research studies support a link between health and heart rate. Researchers from Norway previously reported the results of a large study looking at changes in resting heart rate over 10 years.

They recruited more than 29, people without any history or heart disease, high blood pressureor any other type of cardiovascular disorder, and measured their resting heart rates when they started the study and again 10 years later.

This study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Among the group whose heart rates stayed under 70 throughout the study, there were 8. Among those whose heart rates rose above 85, there were The results also suggested that lowering your resting heart rate over time may be beneficial, but the researchers could not say that for certain. The best time to measure it is before you get out of bed in the morning.

You can measure your heart rate at your wrist or neck by placing one or two fingers over a pulse point, counting the number of beats in 15 seconds, and multiplying by four. By doing these 4 things you can start to lower your resting heart rate and also help maintain a healthy heart:. Related Posts: Can watching sports be bad for your health? Hormone therapy for depression: Are the risks worth… How does sleep affect your heart rate?

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Apr 11,  · Heart rates that are consistently above , even when the patient is sitting quietly, can sometimes be caused by an abnormal heart rhythm. A high heart rate can also mean the heart muscle is weakened by a virus or some other problem that forces it to beat more often to pump enough blood to the rest of the body. Atrial or supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is a fast heart rate that starts in the upper chambers of the heart. Some forms of this particular tachycardia are paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT) or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Jan 23,  · The most common high pulse rate causes can include heavy exercise and anxiety, as well as medical conditions such as pregnancy, an overactive thyroid, and a fever. The average resting heartbeat for a person is between 60 and beats per minute. The pulse is a measurement of the number of heartbeats that a person experiences per minute.

The heart of a healthy adult beats within the range of times per minute at rest. This rate is controlled by electrical signals within the heart. An abnormally high pulse rate above beats per minute is also called tachycardia, and it occurs when the heart tissues produce electrical signals rapidly, affecting the upper or lower chamber of the heart, or both. Tachycardia, or rapid heart rate, may produce either a regular or an irregular rhythm in the heart.

At extremely rapid rates, the heart may not be able to pump oxygen-rich blood efficiently to the rest of the body, and may cause symptoms as well as complications. There are many factors that can cause it. In healthy people, most reasons for having rapid pulses are temporary, although a few other factors may increase one's pulse rate for longer periods.

Rapid heart rates reduce the ability of the heart to pump out blood efficiently to the vital organs like the brain. This deprives the organs of oxygen-rich blood, which can cause the symptoms like dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting spells, palpitations, chest pains, and shortness of breath.

Some people, however, do not experience symptoms, especially when tachycardia is temporary or short-lived. In those with underlying medical conditions, tachycardia may be detected during a physical examination or after doing a test called electrocardiogram.

Having chronically rapid pulses may result in complications that depend on the severity of the existing condition and the duration of the tachycardia.

These complications may include formation of blood clots leading to stroke or heart attack, heart failure, frequent fainting spells or worst of all, sudden death. Some stimuli or underlying conditions increase one's risk of having rapid pulse rates, and these are factors that usually put a strain on the heart. These include the heavy use of tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, or recreational drugs, stress and anxiety, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Other inherent factors that could increase the risk of rapid pulse rates include aging and family history of tachycardia. The goals of treatment for tachycardia are to stop a fast pulse rate when it occurs, to prevent future occurrences, and to reduce complications. Fast heartbeats may be self-limiting, but you may be able to slow down your heart rate by using simple vagal maneuvers which can help regulate tachycardia.

These can be done by coughing forcefully, bearing down like when you are constipated or by simply placing an ice pack on the face.

You may also need medically prescribed medications to stop fast heartbeats, and these include oral anti-arrhythmic drugs like propafenone Rythmol or flecainide Tambocor. If you are brought to the hospital, other anti-arrhythmic drugs may be injected to restore your normal heart rate.

In serious cases, a cardioversion may be required, which involves the delivery of a shock wave to the heart using electrical currents. Future occurrences of tachycardia may be prevented by using different methods, such as the use of anti-arrhythmic medications which may be taken in combination with other heart medications like channel blockers such as diltiazem and verapamil or beta blockers such as metoprolol and esmolol.

When medications fail to prevent further episodes, other means may be employed, such as catheter ablation , pacemaker implantation, or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in severe cases. Other people may need an open heart surgery to destroy or interrupt abnormal electrical pathways that cause life threatening tachycardia. To prevent the formation of blood clots that may lead to stroke or heart attack, doctors may prescribe medications like blood thinners such as dabigatran and warfarin.

Aside from these, the underlying conditions such as heart disease or overactive thyroid gland must be treated to prevent future episodes and possible complications. Heavy breathing usually occurs after an intense workout, but sometimes this condition can also be a symptoms of a medical concern. Last Updated 30 April, Better Health Information from Doctors.

Causes of High Pulse Rate There are many factors that can cause it. Emotional factors: Temporary causes include emotional factors like sudden fear, emotional stress or anxiety, excitement, and nervousness.

These are normal responses of the body, and tachycardia may subside after the stimulus is gone. Exercise or physical exertion: Another temporary cause of rapid heart rates is exercise or physical exertion, which causes the heart to pump more blood to the muscles.

These subside after the individual has sufficiently rested. The heart may also be induced to beat faster after eating a heavy meal, or taking stimulating substances like coffee, tea, alcohol, or tobacco.

Certain medications can also temporarily affect the heart, causing an increase heart rate, such as salbutamol. Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions affect the heart, leading to rapid pulse rate. These include heart diseases such as coronary heart disease and pericarditis , overactive thyroid gland, lung diseases such as emphysema or other chronic lung disorders , fever, anemia, vitamin deficiency, and electrolyte imbalances.

In these cases, rapid heart rates may be prolonged until the underlying condition is treated medically. Symptoms and Complications of High Pulse Rate Rapid heart rates reduce the ability of the heart to pump out blood efficiently to the vital organs like the brain.

Risk Factors Some stimuli or underlying conditions increase one's risk of having rapid pulse rates, and these are factors that usually put a strain on the heart. Treatments for High Pulse Rate The goals of treatment for tachycardia are to stop a fast pulse rate when it occurs, to prevent future occurrences, and to reduce complications.

Stop a fast cardiac rate Fast heartbeats may be self-limiting, but you may be able to slow down your heart rate by using simple vagal maneuvers which can help regulate tachycardia. Prevent future episodes Future occurrences of tachycardia may be prevented by using different methods, such as the use of anti-arrhythmic medications which may be taken in combination with other heart medications like channel blockers such as diltiazem and verapamil or beta blockers such as metoprolol and esmolol.

Prevent complications To prevent the formation of blood clots that may lead to stroke or heart attack, doctors may prescribe medications like blood thinners such as dabigatran and warfarin. What Causes Heavy Breathing? View All » Health Conditions:. Similar Topics:. Heart Rate: What Is Normal? Can Heart Disease Be Reversed?

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